Lost in Austen

A few years ago there was a flurry of Jane Austen films and/or television programmes – some of them were adaptations of the books, others were about Jane herself. I have them all on dvd and the only one I didn’t like much was Mansfield Park, but then it’s not a favourite novel either.

Besides this outbreak of Austiniana there was another, very different, take on her most famous novel. ‘Lost in Austen’ tells the story of a young modern woman who yearns for the manners and courtship and sheer romance of Elizabeth and Darcy’s time, a yearning that is only increased when her boyfriend proposes when he is drunk. And offers her a ring pull to seal the bargain.lostinA

Somehow, and it’s never explained how, which is probably just as well, the heroine, Amanda, (played by Jemima Rooper), discovers Lizzy Bennet in the bathroom of her Hammersmith flat. Lizzy has found a secret door that leads between the 21st century and Longbourn, the Bennet family home in Hertfordshire.

Naturally, Amanda steps through the door which Lizzy promptly closes – because she wants to explore the modern world. Amanda, meanwhile, once she’s got over the suspicion that she’s somehow fallen into a Candid Camera kind of show, is enchanted to find herself a guest in the Bennet family, and even more so when she hears there is a handsome new neighbour, Mr Bingley. It all goes horribly wrong when Bingley falls in love with Amanda and she – of course – falls for Darcy. Pic below is Mr Bingley who is sweet, but as thick as a brick!cambridgepunt

It sounds ridiculous, and of course it is, but it’s so charming and funny that you simply don’t care about the logistics, you just want it all to work out happily in the end – I think Jane Austen would have enjoyed it. Elliot Cowan’s Mr Darcy is even besotted enough to comply with her request that he should rise out of the pond in a wet shirt. ‘I’m having a post-modern moment,’ she giggles.darcywetshirtcowan

The performances are terrific, particularly Guy Henry’s utterly disgusting Mr Collins whose habits make you shudder, and who imports his own equally appalling brothers as suitors for the Bennet daughters. Best of all are Hugh Bonneville as Mr Bennet and Alex Kingston as the perpetually worried Mrs Bennet. I’ve always been sorry for her, stuck with a husband who isn’t bothered that she and the five girls will be homeless when he dies. Not only that, he makes snotty remarks about the folly of marrying a beautiful but foolish woman.

In all the Austen adaptations I’ve seen, Mrs Bennet is played as a fool and a scold and the worst example is in the Colin Firth version, where Mrs B screams all the time. She is also played by actresses who are too old whereas Mrs Bennet, whose eldest daughter is only about twenty-two, would almost certainly have been not much more than in her very early forties. The other thing about Mrs Bennet is that she can’t have been just a pretty face – she has to have been sexy, and not one of the earlier screen incarnations has indicated this.

Alex Kingston is terrific as a sexy, silly woman whose life is ruled by the fear of what is to become of her daughters when her feckless, careless husband departs this life. In ‘Lost in Austen’ Hugh Bonneville eventually realises this and there is a lovely scene after her set-to with Lady Catherine de Burgh. Mr Bennet, who has refused to sleep upstairs for some time, is delighted with his valiant wife and informs her that he will ‘sleep above stairs that night.’ Mrs Bennet’s squeal of excitement is pure delight. (I loved the series when it came out in 2008 and loved it all over again when I was given the dvd at Christmas).

 

In other news, I wondered, when David Bowie died, which well-known actor’s death would upset me as much as the Bowie fans. Should have kept my mouth shut because I found out, a couple of days later:alan rickmansheriff-of-nottingham-the-sheriff-of-nottingham-25662758-462-260

(All photos from places like Wikipaedia and film/tv sites so I hope there’s no breach of copyright!)

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